THE HISTORY OF WIMBLEDON FOOTBALL CLUB
1949
Saturday, 01 April 1950
Isthmian League
 
Walthamstow Avenue
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2 - 2
Wimbledon
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Jock Woods again moved back to the half-back line in place of Ken Perkins, Harry Bull switching to the now vacant wing position and Freddie Gauntlett rewarded for his performances in the reserves with a return to the first team on the other wing.

In the first minute Turner had the goal at his mercy, but shot wildly. Tyrell then forced through on the right and Arthur Parsons used fine judgement to intercept the ball and prevent Lewis getting his head to it. His judgement slipped when Preskett fired in a high shot, but Pat Field cleared off the line. Despite those chances the Dons were holding their own and took the lead when Jack Wallis switched to the right and received a through pass from Woods before beating Robson from twenty yards, a goal that even had the home supporters applauding. The keeper also had to save from Harry Stannard before a game of head tennis in the Wimbledon area ended in a scramble from which Turner equalised.

The second half was evenly contested for the first thirty minutes and there were narrow escapes at both ends. Parson proved equal to the Avenue attack and Woods centre from wide was deflected and ran across the goal-line, the Vic Bird’s first-time shot went over the bar. When Parsons failed to hold a high shot from Scott Arthur Maggs managed to hack the ball off the line and when Tyrell followed in to tap home Parsons had recovered and made a fine save when a goal looked certain. At the other end Charlie Smith placed the ball wide with only the keeper to beat. When Wallis robbed Lewis and lobbed the ball into the box towards Stannard Drage handled and, with fifteen minutes left the centre-forward made no mistake from the spot. The lead only lasted five minutes as Tyrell took advantage of a defensive mix-up to level. Walthamstow pushed for a winner and Turner hit the inside of an upright but Parsons dived across his goal to clear. The point took the home side to the top of the table and kept the Dons in the hunt.